LA Angels News

LA Angels: Grading Each Offseason Signing

By Vincent Page
CINCINNATI, OH - SEPTEMBER 25: Matt Harvey #32 of the Cincinnati Reds throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals at Great American Ball Park on September 25, 2018 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OH - SEPTEMBER 25: Matt Harvey #32 of the Cincinnati Reds throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals at Great American Ball Park on September 25, 2018 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images) /
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CINCINNATI, OH – SEPTEMBER 25: Matt Harvey #32 of the Cincinnati Reds throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals at Great American Ball Park on September 25, 2018 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
CINCINNATI, OH – SEPTEMBER 25: Matt Harvey #32 of the Cincinnati Reds throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals at Great American Ball Park on September 25, 2018 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images) /

RHP, Matt Harvey

As the Angels chased after (and missed out on) every high-caliber pitcher they chased this year, they eventually fed their starving fans by signing Matt Harvey to a one-year, $10.5 million deal. Whether the meal was cheese and crackers or a five-course dinner is yet to be seen, however, Matt Harvey does bring value to the Halos.

While his 4.94 ERA in 2018 is not encouraging, it did drop to 4.50 after he was traded to Cincinnati. While those numbers are not what the former Cy Young candidate would hope for, they do offer hope for upside. Harvey found his velocity begin coming back once he joined the Reds, and a fully healthy offseason could be a huge boost for the 29-year old as he hopes to continue his career resurgence.

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Even if Harvey is mostly the same pitcher he was last year, he still offers value to the Angels. Last season with the Reds, Harvey went deep into games often, helping preserve the Reds bullpen. For an Angels team who overused their relievers (resulting in 26 blown saves, fifth worst in the MLB), a starting pitcher like Harvey is a big value.

If he is the same exact pitcher he was in 2018, then the deal is fine. However, if he continues gaining velocity and finds even a hint of his former self, the Angels become real contenders with Harvey, Tyler Skaggs, and Andrew Heaney at the top of their rotation.

Signing Grade: B+

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