Angels All-Time Lists

Los Angeles Angels best moments that didn’t make the top 10.

By David Rice
PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 12: The All-Star Game logo is displayed on the field before the start of the 82nd MLB All-Star Game at Chase Field on July 12, 2011 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JULY 12: The All-Star Game logo is displayed on the field before the start of the 82nd MLB All-Star Game at Chase Field on July 12, 2011 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) /
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When you have a franchise like the Los Angeles Angels that has been around nearly 60 years (57 to be exact), it is very hard to pick the top 10 moments in their history. You’re sure to leave out a few great ones.

This series of articles detailing the top 10 moments in Los Angeles Angels history are no different.  When we were compiling them, there were debates on which ones should be in the top 10 on the list.  This article focuses on the great moments in Angels history that did not make the cut, but still deserve mentioning as some of the best in Angel history.

1989 MLB All-Star Game starts with a bang. 

After a 22-year absence the Major League Baseball All-Star Game returned to Anaheim and what a game it was. In the top of the first inning the National League touched AL starter Dave Stewart for two runs on RBI-singles by Kevin Mitchell and Howard Johnson to put the NL up 2-0.  It could have been more if not for two-sport star Bo Jackson’s diving catch of a Pedro Guerrero line drive to end the NL threat.

However, it was the bottom of the first inning that most fans will remember for years to come. With former president Ronald Reagan making a guest appearance in the broadcast booth with baseball legendary announcer Vin Scully started the bottom of the first off with a bang.

On the second pitch from NL starter Rick Reuschel, Jackson blasted the ball deep to center field landing halfway up the green tarp which was used to cover the seats so that it would give the hitters a good backdrop.  Jackson blast was measured at 464 feet and left Reagan and Scully in awe of the shear power of Jackson.

Boston Red Sox third baseman Wade Boggs would follow Jackson with another solo home run to tie the game at 2, marking the only time in All-Star game history that the first two batters for a team would hit back-to-back home runs. What was even more intriguing was Reagan was in the middle of answering a Scully question when Boggs connected on a 3-2 pitch by Reuschel.

Reagan said, “That looks like it’s going there too.” Scully came in saying “Eric Davis to the track, and it is gone.”

Jackson would drive in his second run of the game in the third inning by beating out a potential double play ball.  This would give the AL a 3-2 lead that they would not relinquish.  Jackson took home the All-Star Game MVP honors for his exploits.

17 APR 1994: BO JACKSON OF THE CALIFORNIA ANGELS BLASTS A HOME RUN VERSUS THE TORONTO BLUE JAYS AT ANAHEIM STADIUM. Mandatory Credit: Stephen Dunn/ALLSPORT
17 APR 1994: BO JACKSON OF THE CALIFORNIA ANGELS BLASTS A HOME RUN VERSUS THE TORONTO BLUE JAYS AT ANAHEIM STADIUM. Mandatory Credit: Stephen Dunn/ALLSPORT /

Even though this was not an Angel moment per say, it was still a special moment many Angel fans will remember well including this one. Bo Jackson would end as an Angel a few years later.

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