Mike Trout

How Would Mike Trout Fare on the Gridiron?

By Vincent Page
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 21: Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim celebrates after the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Minnesota Vikings 38-7 in their NFC Championship game at Lincoln Financial Field on January 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 21: Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim celebrates after the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Minnesota Vikings 38-7 in their NFC Championship game at Lincoln Financial Field on January 21, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images) /
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Mike Trout‘s Philadelphia Eagles (after defeating Tyler Skaggs‘ Vikings) will be taking on the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl Sunday evening. Trout’s superfan lifestyle has been well-documented, but how would the two-time MVP play on his hometown Eagles?

First, we have to analyze the best position for Mike Trout. The center fielder stands at 6’2″ and weighs 235 pounds. His size best puts categorizes him as a tight end or middle linebacker. However. his skill set may make a different position his best bet at success on the gridiron.

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As all Halo fans know, Trout is an athletic marvel. A true five-tool baseball player, he has an elite first step when tracking a fly ball. Since coming into the league, Trout has added onto that elite first step (that would make NFL teams drool) by always taking efficient routes to fly balls.

Though he is a little over the average weight, Mike Trout would make for an elite safety should he ever choose to jump sports. Often compared to “playing center field” the safety position allows for the player to make instant judgements off their instincts. This is something Trout has proven to do extremely well, at least while at the plate. His vision and discipline in 2017 became truly elite, as his 18.5% walk rate and 17.1 strikeout percentage put him in the top crop of hitters in the MLB.

Before someone claims football requires completely different athleticism than baseball, Trout is more than just a baseball player. While he was never playing under Friday night lights in high school, he did play power forward for his basketball team.

Next: Assessing the Middle Infield for Halos in 2018

Trout would be able to use his instincts and range in the defending passing game, but could he lower the boom on running backs? Well, he’d have to learn the intricacies of tackling but a 235-pound man who can top 20 MPH while stealing bases is not someone I’d want running at me.

Allowing Mike Trout to take over the middle of the field for a defense has worked before, just ask the Angels. Maybe add in a prime Albert Pujols as a pass rusher and Andrelton Simmons as a cornerback and call it an elite defense.

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