LA Angels News

LA Angels: Three Worst, Three Best Offseason Acquisitions After Three Weeks

By Vincent Page
SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 02: Trevor Cahill #53 and Jonathan Lucroy #20 huddle with pitching coach Doug White in the sixth inning against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on April 2, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WA - APRIL 02: Trevor Cahill #53 and Jonathan Lucroy #20 huddle with pitching coach Doug White in the sixth inning against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on April 2, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images) /
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SEATTLE, WA – APRIL 02: Trevor Cahill #53 and Jonathan Lucroy #20 huddle with pitching coach Doug White in the sixth inning against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on April 2, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images)
SEATTLE, WA – APRIL 02: Trevor Cahill #53 and Jonathan Lucroy #20 huddle with pitching coach Doug White in the sixth inning against the Seattle Mariners at T-Mobile Park on April 2, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Lindsey Wasson/Getty Images) /

Third Best: Cody Allen

The fact that Cody Allen is the third best rather than first or second is merely because he seemingly hasn’t been used or tested much this year. He has only allowed one run in his 6.1 innings pitched and has converted all four of his save opportunities.

Overall, Allen has been extremely solid and is proving he knows how to navigate the late innings even without the velocity he had prior to signing with the Angels. He is a vital part of the Halo’s bullpen, which has been an elite unit for the organization in 2019.

Second Best: Jonathan Lucroy

One of the most important parts of the Angels improved rotation and bullpen has been Jonathan Lucroy. His game management and framing behind the plate have been noticeable. Those two skills were something that Lucroy has brought with him wherever he has gone in his career.

After losing fan favorite Martin Maldonado last year, Lucroy is a very similar catcher, with the only difference being Maldonado’s arm is superior. However, Lucroy makes up for that at the plate, where he has been a consistent hitter. His .278 average is one of the best on the team. The Angels bet on him having a bounce back year at the plate after hitting only .241 last year, and that gamble is certainly paying off so far into the season.

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The Best of the Best: Trevor Cahill

I’ve said it a handful of times this year, but I was very, very wrong about Cahill. After his signing with the Angels I saw a guy with awful home/road splits after pitching in Oakland last year. However, even with his poor start last time out, he has undoubtedly been the best starter for the Angels this season, and it isn’t relatively close.

One overall problem for the rotation has been its inability to go deep into games, which in turn exhausts the bullpen. Cahill, however, has been able to get through the sixth inning in three of his four starts. That itself is valuable, but the fact that he does so with efficiency makes him that much better for the team, and the best signing or trade from this offseason by far.

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